Image credit: DARPA
Image credit: DARPA

The virtual seminar will be held from noon to 1:30 p.m. (E.T.)

Throughout human history, military forces have sought to exploit innovations in science and technology to achieve success on the battlefield, very often fielding new technologies before societies could weigh the risks of doing so and impose controls on their use. Today, rapid advances in a range of scientific and technological fields—artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, cyberspace, remote sensing, and microelectronics—are again being exploited for military use. And, as before, control efforts are lagging far behind the process of weaponization. This talk will offer a framework strategy aimed at restricting the military use of those technologies deemed most threatening to strategic stability. It draws on an essay published in Arms Control Today, December 2020.

About the speaker: Michael Klare is Five College professor emeritus of peace and world security studies (a joint appointment at Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, and Smith Colleges and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst), and was director of the Five College Program in Peace and World Security Studies.  He is the defense correspondent for The Nation magazine and a senior visiting fellow working on emerging technologies at the Arms Control Association in Washington DC. He has written widely on U.S. military policy, international peace and security affairs, the global arms trade, and global resource politics.